MGEX

This page provides an overview of the Satellites used in worldwide Satellite Based Augmentation Systems.

Satellites

System Common Name Longitude Int. Sat. ID NORAD ID PRN Signals Notes
EGNOS Inmarsat 3-F2 (AOR-E) 15.5°W 1996-053A 24307 120 L1 Inmarsat 3-F2 began Safety-of-Life Service on March 2, 2011, and is transmitting message type 2.
Inmarsat 4-F2 (IOR-W) 25°E 2005-044A 28899 126 L1 Inmarsat-4-F2 began Safety-of-Life Service on March 22, 2012, and is transmitting message type 2.
SES-5 (Sirius-5, Astra-4B) 5°E 2012-036A 38652 136 L1/L5 Launched 2012/07/10, operational since Sep. 02, 2015.
Astra-5B 31.5°E 2014-011B 39617 123 L1/L5 Launched March 22, 2014. Transmission of L1 test signals started Dec. 11, 2014.
GAGAN GSAT-8 55°E 2011-022A 37605 127 L1/L5 Launched May 20, 2011. Certifed horizontal/vertical service since Feb. 2014 / April 2015.
GSAT-10 83°E 2012-051B 38779 128 L1/L5 Launched Sep. 28, 2012. Certifed horizontal/vertical service since Feb. 2014 / April 2015.
MSAS MTSAT-1R 140°E 2005-006A 28622 129 L1 MSAS commissioned for aviation use on September 27, 2007. Either satellite can transmit both PRN signals if necessary.
MTSAT-2 145°E 2006-004A 28937 137 L1 MSAS commissioned for aviation use on September 27, 2007. Either satellite can transmit both PRN signals if necessary.
QZSS QZS-1 135°E 2010-045A 37158 183 L1 See QZSS Status Page
SDCM Luch-5A 167°E 2011-074B 37951 140 L1 Launched on December 11, 2011. Initially positioned at 58.5°E, it was shifted to 95°E between about May 30 and June 28, 2012, then shifted 167°E between about Nov. 30 and Dec. 22, 2012. Transmissions as PRN 140 began on July 12, 2012. Transmitted occasional, non-coherent code/carrier test signals.
Luch-5B 16°W 2014-023A 39727 141 L1 Launched April28, 2014. Testing may have started using PRN 140, not 141.
Luch-5V 16°W 2012-061A 38977 125 L1 Launched Nov. 2, 2012, and started transmitting signals on Jan. 17, 2013.
WAAS TeleSat Anik F1R (CRE) 107.3°W 2005-036A 28868 138 L1/L5 Anik F1R ranging supports enroute through precision approach modes. The payload, operated by Lockheed Martin for the FAA, is known as LMPRS-2.
Intelsat Galaxy 15 (CRW) 133°W 2005-041A 28884 135 L1/L5 Galaxy 15 ranging supports enroute through precision approach modes. Switched to backup satellite oscillator on Jan. 6, 2012. The payload, operated by Lockheed Martin for the FAA, is known as LMPRS-1.
Inmarsat 4-F3 (AMR) 98°W 2008-039A 33278 133 L1/L5 Inmarsat-4-F3 supports non-precision approach ranging service.


Notes:
  • The information given above is largely based on the The Almanac maintained by R. Langley for the GPS World magazine.
  • Dual-frequency (L1/L5) observations of WAAS and GAGAN satellites are provided by a limited set of monitoring stations of the MGEX network. The respective stations and tracked satellites are listed in the RINEX Observation File Summary generated on a daily basis by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern.
  • In RINEX observations and navigation files, SBAS satellites are identified by a three character satellite number made up of the constellation letter "S" and the two digit number nn=PRN-100. For QZSS (see QZSS Interface Specification, different PRN numbers are employed for the L1 SAIF SBAS signal (PRN(SAIF)=183, 184, ...) and the other ranging signals (PRN(std)=193,194,...). In order to ensure a unique RINEX satellite number for each QZSS satellite, it is recommended to use the satellite number "Jnn" with n=PRN(SAIF)-183 (=PRN(std)-193) when referring to QZSS SAIF observations or navigation messages. The use of an SBAS RINEX satellite number "Snn" with nn=PRN(SAIF)-100 is deprecated for QZSS satellites.
  • Information on SBAS system status is available at the ESA EGNOS web site and the WAAS test team web site of the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
  • For the assignment of GPS and SBAS PRN numbers see the information page of the Los Angeles Air Force Base.
  • On March 22 and 23, 2012, Inmarsat-4-F2 at 25 degrees east using PRN126 and Artemis at 21.5 degrees east using PRN124 switched roles. PRN126 became an EGNOS operational signal-in-space satellite while PRN124 became the test satellite, transmitting message type 0. PRN120 and PRN126 returned to service around 17:00 UTC on Tuesday, June 26. According to an EGNOS service announcement dated April 3, 2012 the switch was due to the aging state of the Artemis satellite. (Source: CANSPACE, GPS World)



Last Updated: 2017/01/23 15:58:23
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